Mortgage Reports

Mortgage Rates Newsletter - Market Analysis

Daily Mortgage Rates Update Archive Description

Mortgage rates fell modestly today, with bond market strength both before and after the release of the Fed Minutes (a more detailed account of the Fed meeting that took place 3 weeks ago). Stronger bond markets correlate with lower rates. Bonds tend to benefit from weak economic data, low inflation expectations, and an accommodative monetary policy stance from the Fed. Today's economic data was generally weaker, but of particular importance at the moment were the inflation expectations in the consumer sentiment data, which came in near the lowest levels since the financial crisis. The Fed Minutes also mentioned some concern over intractably low inflation, though they continue to expect a rebound based on a strong labor market. Bond markets are already well aware the Fed is planning on hiking
Posted: November 22, 2017, 9:12 pm
Mortgage rates were unchanged today, on average, although a few lenders made small adjustments to rates sheets in response to bond market volatility. Bond markets began the day heading into stronger territory (which implies lower rates), but gave up much of the gains by early afternoon. That prompted a few lenders to raise the costs associated with prevailing rates. In other words, markets didn't move enough for published interest rates to change. Those tend to move in .125% increments and it takes an uncommonly big day in bond markets to push mortgage rates higher or lower by that much. The "upfront costs" associated with a mortgage (origination and discount, typically) give lenders a way to fine-tune the overall cost of financing. It's those costs that moved higher, but again, only for a
Posted: November 21, 2017, 10:18 pm
Mortgage rates moved slightly higher today against the backdrop of the unique bond market conditions seen on Thanksgiving week. Bond markets underlie mortgage rates, and there's generally a certain level of participation that traders and mortgage lenders can count on. That participation wanes on major holiday weeks and the remaining players tend to behave a bit more conservatively. This is seen in the form of interest rates staying inside recent boundaries and mortgage lenders not getting too aggressive with pricing. Inside those boundaries, however, movement is far less predictable . After all, with fewer players in the game, each trader has a bigger say in the direction rates will move. If there are more bonds being sold than bought, regardless of the motivation, rates will move higher. This
Posted: November 20, 2017, 9:59 pm
Mortgage rates barely budged today--not too surprising considering today's bond market levels (which underlie rates) were roughly in line with yesterday's. The average lender is quoting conventional 30yr fixed rates of 4.0% or slightly lower for top tier scenarios. Movement has been minimal since October with day-over-day change most frequently occurring at the "cost" level. In other words, bond markets don't move enough every day for lenders to change interest rates by their standard 0.125% increments. Instead, the cost (or rebate) associated with any given rate serves as a fine-tuning adjustment. The cost is typically calculated based on a percentage of the loan amount. It can move by more than half a perfect in some cases ($500 for every $100k borrowed) before it would make sense for some
Posted: November 17, 2017, 10:28 pm
Mortgage rates moved higher today, but the changes were minimal for most lenders. Bond markets (which underlie interest rates) have been searching for inspiration recently and largely coming up short. This morning contained several economic reports and the House passed its tax bill in the afternoon, but none of those events caused much of a stir for bonds. In fact, all of the bond market movement responsible for today's higher rates occurred during Asian and European trading hours. When US traders got in for the day, bonds were almost perfectly sideways through 3pm. With next week bringing the Thanksgiving holiday and with the Senate not even taking up the tax bill debate until the following week (they're out all of next week), it's fair to wonder how much worse the lack of inspiration will
Posted: November 16, 2017, 10:17 pm